Direct Instruction Data



Recently, I posted about how I set up and run direct instruction work centers. You can read the post here if you missed it. Today I wanted to share about how my teaching assistants and I take data during the work centers.

My teaching assistants are each assigned a center and have a big storage container to keep all of the center materials and data sheets organized. Here is a peek inside one of the storage containers:

There is a folder for each student with the data sheets specific to the student. Below is a peek inside a student folder. 


My students need constant repetition of skills or they lose the skill. To make sure that students get consistent review of mastered skills, we assign one day a week to practice mastered skills that are currently on maintenance programming. All of the data sheets of mastered skills are kept on the left inside pocket of the folder.  For us, Monday is the day we focus on maintenance programming. After 2 days off, it is a good way to start the week on a positive note. 

An example of a mastered data sheet:

The skill is increased or moved to maintenance after the student achieves 100% accuracy on 3 consecutive sessions. We use the prompting hierarchy and system that Dr. Andrew Bondy, from The Pyramid Approach To Autism, recommends. I like it because I want all the info I can get. Some of my students make very slow progress. Being able to look at the different prompts that the student needed helps me determine if a student is making any progress at all. For example, if a student needed a full physical prompt when the skill was introduced and now only needs a gestural he is making progress! 

Here is a list of the symbols we use in our data. We have it posted in the classroom. 




I keep all of my data sheets in a binder instead of folders. Each student has a section in the binder. I have a set of 3 drawers next to my work center table with all of the materials I need. I also paperclip sight words or other materials to data sheets as needed.





As students master their current skills, we write the updates on the bottom sheet. This is another way to figure out the rate of learning. 

Grab a free copy of the data sheet I use by clicking HERE.
I would love to hear how you collect data! Share in the comment section so we can all learn.



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11 comments

  1. I really feel I need to do better on my data collection. I like what you have created, I typically put my information into my grade book.

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    1. Data collection can get overwhelming. Find a system that is easy and fits your needs and go with it. For me, I need a system that shows very small changes.

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  2. I love your data sheet! Do you have this in your TpT store?

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    1. I just updated this post with a link to my data sheet. It's a freebie! :D

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  3. I also want to be better about my data collection. I am used to doing data collection for a 1:1 aba session in private therapy, so transferring that to a class of 9 with all different targets that happen at all parts of the day becomes a task to tackle. I am on year two as a teacher and looking to better my system so its more functional. Our district gives us data sheets to take data on for the 9 weeks each grading period we take data, but often times when tracking a student identifying #'s 1-30 that makes it tricky to document in one little box. DO you have any suggestions for data taking for objectives that maybe cannot be done at a table with materials? Like maybe items targeted during circle time (answering questions about a story...etc)? I find that at the end of the day I have to try and remember because I cant just take 5 minutes of down time to write it down when it happens! Any feedback would be great. I love to learn from others experiences!
    Darcy
    Greco03@gmail.com

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    1. Hi Darcy!
      Do you have paras? I train my paras to take data so they can fill out data sheets during the different groups. For example, 1 of my paras observes and takes data during morning meeting while I am leading. I keep my data sheets on clipboards that the para can grab for that group. All of the data sheets for morning meeting are on one clipboard.
      Feel free to email me if you have more questions! Pspetralia@gmail.com
      Thanks,
      Pam

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  4. This is ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL! Thank you for sharing your secrets. I am currently a Teacher Assistant finishing up exams to become a certified teacher in the state of Florida. I, along with the class's other assistant, collect all the data and I was looking for a way to organize all of my collections.

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    1. So glad it was helpful! Good luck with your certification!!!
      Pam

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  5. I love your Data Shorthand!!! I modified it to fit my needs and am training my paraprofessionals how to take data using it. Thank you!

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    1. Excellent!!! Glad you were able to make it work!
      Pam

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